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Problem picture #1

What's wrong with this picture?


You can learn from the mistakes in this picture
You can learn from the mistakes in this picture

Photographs like this one above are sometimes intentionally made by professional photographers. Imagine, for example, seeing this shot full-page in a magazine for parents with bold wording covering the blurry lockers that says “If this is what your child sees at school, does your child need glasses or drug counselling?” This picture would perhaps be ideal for such an ad. However, it wouldn’t do much for the school year book, your Facebook page or the family album.

WHAT IS WRONG WITH IT?

Framing. If the subject is meant to be the girl closest to the camera, the photographer placed the subject almost dead center in the viewfinder, instead of filling the frame. The picture should have been taken with the camera turned vertically and the frame filled with the subject. Horizontal framing would have been all right if the photographer had turned the camera more to the right to include the other people, filling the frame with them and eliminating the uninteresting expanse of lockers on the left. (Visit Framing for helpful information.)

Blurriness. The more serious problem, however, is that there is a great deal of blur, which indicates that too slow a shutter speed was used to freeze the movement of the subjects.

The blurriness evident in the lockers in the background also indicates some camera shake. A faster shutter speed would have eliminated that, too. (See Shutter speed guide.)

If a faster shutter speed could not have been used because the film speed was too low for the lighting conditions, then flash should have been used. With a digital camera, though, you can adjust the camera's sensitivity to a higher ISO setting to use a faster shutter speed.

Click here or on the link on the page bottom for Problem picture #2.


 
Further information...
Film speed
Flash
Framing
People
Shutter speed guide
Shutter speed/aperture combinations
Shutter speeds for flash
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