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Could You Analyze This Scenario for Me?
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mimazee
Date Posted: Sep/27/2010 4:05 PM
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I am doing product shot for dresses, and am leaning toward the kind where pieces are laid out against white. I have looked at some examples online, and am trying to figure out the setup. If you could share your insights, I'd appreciate it greatly.




1) Are they inserting some kind of transparent frame?


This one is obviously a bad giveaway,  

but there are subtle ones. For this, I can see knocking out the negative spaces in-between the straps.  


But for this one, the way the shadow falls on the inside of the dress, I'm not sure if something is supporting the dress from the inside.  

Also, getting a clean knock-out on a see-through fabric seems infeasible. If I would take a wild guess, use a transparent frame and a polarizer?  






2) If they are not using an inside frame, how do I get natural-looking volume?

For example, I like the way this setup gives a space between front and back,  

but am not crazy when it looks too flat.  

I understand padded dresses naturally have more dimensions to them, but it seems there is more to it.





3) Should I lay them out flat on the ground of hang them?


On this shot, the way light falls on the side of the dress, I suspect they have hanged it. Then, how I do I keep it straight (perpendicular to the floor)?  






4) Is there a trick to get a smooth knock-out?

I'm trying to stay away from crude silos like this one as it's kind of spooky when the dress looks as though floating in the air.  

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Steve
Date Posted: Sep/28/2010 5:18 AM
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This may be overly simplistic a view but that work is worthy of attempting to copy. The primary thing is to make sure your lighting is such that you can remove any shadows etc. when you print or use the images in whatever format you wind up with. Having sufficent space to hang the dresses or product to achieve the effect is important too. Give us a sample of your attempts so there is a comparative base.

-------------------------
Steve

Reality can be beaten with enough imagination..... Mark Twain

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mimazee
Date Posted: Sep/28/2010 10:58 AM
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Thank you for the input, Steve. I will post my work soon.

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swanseamale47
Date Posted: Sep/28/2010 1:01 PM
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Some may be held with fishing line, others use a clear plastic frame thingy, and I have seen wire frames as well, if the back/inside doesn't show you could even use a model and mask (or erase) him/her out.

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E.
Date Posted: Sep/28/2010 2:57 PM
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I suspect there was photo shop work done to remove the props/thingys used to give the dresses demention. My preference would be to Ise real moels as I thinkthedress shows better that way and the customer gets a better visual of howit wold look on them.

I help a charity sell wedig gowns and it's amazing howrje brides will pass up a dress they see hanging there butas soon as someonetries it on every one wants it. This sure boosts sales.

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mimazee
Date Posted: Sep/29/2010 11:40 AM
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Yeah, I was thinking about conversion myself. I'm not sure if we have resource required for it right now, I sure want to move toward it. Thank you for the input. I appreciate it.

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